MarineBio Conservation SocietyEcology Research News   :: ScienceDaily

Carbon goes with the flow

Tue, 13 Nov 2018 14:17:55 EST ~ Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical -- CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new research adds a dimension to the vertical perspective by showing how water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems -- especially during floods. These findings -- which analyzed more than 1,000 watersheds, covering about 75 percent of the contiguous US -- have implications for climate change and water quality. Find out more...

Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:16:24 EST ~ A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. Monitoring the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit, researchers found the bat is responsible for only some, and could be managed effectively without the need to cull. Find out more...

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:24:17 EST ~ The physical presence of trails has less impact on forest birds than how frequently the trails are used by people, finds the first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans. This is also the case when trails have been used for decades, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to human activity. To minimize disturbance, people should avoid roaming from designated pathways. Find out more...

Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions

Fri, 09 Nov 2018 10:14:51 EST ~ Geographers have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions. Find out more...

Warming waters caused rapid -- and opposite -- shifts in connected marine communities

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:24:26 EST ~ Two connected marine ecosystems -- the Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea -- experienced big and opposite changes in their fish communities over a 30-year period. Rapid warming drove smaller ocean fishes to shift abruptly northward from one ecosystem to the other. Find out more...

New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:22:08 EST ~ New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage. Find out more...

Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 13:41:36 EST ~ In the first study of its kind, scientists show that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function. Find out more...

Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 13:05:25 EST ~ Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis. Find out more...

The secret behind coral reef diversity? Time, lots of time

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 13:05:14 EST ~ One of the world's premier diving destinations owes its reputation as a hot spot of marine biodiversity to being undisturbed over millions of years, according to ecologists. The researchers conclude that patterns of high diversity may take tens of millions of years to arise, but can be wiped out in a few years by human impacts. Find out more...

Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 09:13:20 EST ~ Around 75 percent of marine biodiversity in Finnish waters is left unprotected, reveals a performance assessment of the country's current Marine Protected Area network. Increasing protection by just 1 percent in the most biodiverse areas could double conservation of the most important species. In addition to identifying areas of high conservation value, the methodology can also be used in ecosystem-based marine spatial planning and impact avoidance, including siting of wind energy, aquaculture and other human activities. Find out more...