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Tiny globetrotters: Bacteria which live in the Arctic and the Antarctic

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 12:57:38 EST ~ Geoscientists have compared micro-organisms in the polar regions, noting that some bacteria can be found in both regions of Earth. Find out more...

A single sand grain harbors up to 100,000 microorganisms from thousands of species

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 11:58:53 EST ~ Just imagine, you are sitting on a sunny beach, contentedly letting the warm sand trickle through your fingers. Millions of sand grains. What you probably can't imagine: at the same time, billions upon billions of bacteria are also trickling through your fingers. Between 10,000 and 100,000 microorganisms live on each single grain of sand, as revealed in a new study. This means that an individual grain of sand can have twice as many residents as, say, the city of Fairbanks, Alaska! Find out more...

The public fear sharks less when they understand their behavior

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:56:09 EST ~ Researchers surveyed more than 500 visitors to an aquarium 'shark tunnel' to understand how attitudes to sharks and government shark policies can change. Find out more...

Sea-level rise projections made hazy by Antarctic instability

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:55:45 EST ~ It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new analysis. The study is the first to link global and local sea-level rise projections with simulations of two major mechanisms by which climate change can affect the vast Antarctic ice sheet. Find out more...

Suburban ponds are a septic buffet

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 12:54:04 EST ~ Human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds, new research indicates. Researchers found that residential, suburban land use is altering the dynamics of the food chain, as well as where nutrients originate and how they move through pond ecosystems. Find out more...

Shrinking wilderness ignored at our peril

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 12:53:59 EST ~ Maps of the world's most important wilderness areas are now freely available online. Find out more...

How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopes

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 19:27:41 EST ~ A study has found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track. Find out more...

Too many nutrients make microbes less responsive

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 14:08:48 EST ~ Bacteria in lakes play a key role in maintaining water quality by absorbing excess nitrogen and phosphorus. They also help store carbon, which has implications for our climate. But, as it turns out, their ability to do these tasks varies depending on the makeup of the lake in which they live. In short, location matters most. Find out more...

World-first uses satellites, ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversity

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:04:16 EST ~ In a world-first, a research team has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor. Find out more...

Traces of historical reindeer grazing can still be observed after 100 years

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 09:19:23 EST ~ With the holiday season around the corner, most people may first think of reindeer as Santa Claus' trusted helpers. But it turns out that reindeer are not only good at pulling Santa's sleigh; they can also teach us important lessons about the functioning of ecosystems. By studying small meadows in the Swedish mountains, formed by historical traditional reindeer herding practices, researchers revealed long-lasting ecological effects induced by reindeer grazing. Find out more...