MarineBio Conservation SocietyInvasive Species News   :: ScienceDaily

Long-term study reveals one invasive insect can change a forest bird community

Wed, 23 May 2018 09:12:56 EDT ~ Eastern hemlock forests have been declining due to a non-native insect pest. A new study presents some of the best data showing how the decline of a single tree species leads to the disappearance of birds specialized to them. The data also indicate birds associated with non-hemlock habitat features are spreading into former hemlock forests. A single insect species has led to a less diverse bird community across this landscape. Find out more...

Top 10 new species for 2018

Wed, 23 May 2018 08:02:11 EDT ~ The large and small, beautiful and bizarre are among the newly discovered animals, plants and microbes announced as the Top 10 New Species for 2018. Find out more...

Invasive seaweed makes fish change their behavior

Tue, 22 May 2018 13:26:36 EDT ~ Researchers have found that changes in the seascape may impact the behavior of fish and could be leaving them less options for refuge and more vulnerable to predators. Find out more...

First record of large-antlered muntjac in Vietnam

Tue, 22 May 2018 12:33:27 EDT ~ In November 2017 -- under a biodiversity monitoring and assessment activity supported by the US Agency for International Development -- scientists and conservationists captured photographs of one of the rarest and most threatened mammal species of Southeast Asia, the large-antlered muntjac, in Quang Nam province, central Vietnam. Find out more...

Giant invasive flatworms found in France and overseas French territories

Tue, 22 May 2018 08:21:34 EDT ~ One of the consequences of globalization is the introduction of invasive species. Giant hammerhead flatworms, or land planarians, up to 40 cm (over 1 foot) in length, are reported from France and overseas French territories. Find out more...

The chestnut gall wasp -- The threat of an invasive species with clonal reproduction

Mon, 21 May 2018 14:38:26 EDT ~ A molecular study carried out on the chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus, has revealed the absence of genetic variability in this invasive species, a chestnut-tree parasite, in Europe. This is due to the fact that the wasp's reproduction is strictly parthenogenetic, the females produce more females without having to be fertilized by a male. The high capacity of reproduction of the females, producing genetically identical daughters, give this insect a high invasive potential. Find out more...

Asian tiger mosquito on the move

Fri, 18 May 2018 10:27:34 EDT ~ Scientists have compared the ecological niches of the Asian tiger mosquito and the yellow fever mosquito, both of which transmit infectious diseases, on various continents. The invasion time span plays an important role in their expansion and the Asian tiger mosquito has not yet arrived in all regions where it would find a suitable environment. Find out more...

Climate change broadens threat of emerald ash borer

Thu, 17 May 2018 11:37:51 EDT ~ More Canadian cities will experience damage from the emerald ash borer than previously thought. As a result of climate change and fewer days of extreme cold, the beetle may eat its way further north than originally estimated. Find out more...

Monitoring of tropical trees in face of climate change

Thu, 17 May 2018 10:23:56 EDT ~ Experts have challenged the principle that tropical ecosystems are aseasonal -- after discovering regular cycles in fruiting, flowering and leafing in such climates. Find out more...

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of years

Thu, 17 May 2018 08:18:35 EDT ~ Current global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases. Find out more...