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Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfish

Fri, 25 May 2018 12:32:04 EDT ~ Twelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion. Find out more...

Bacteria and viruses ejected from the ocean

Fri, 25 May 2018 09:54:20 EDT ~ Certain types of bacteria and viruses are readily ejected into the atmosphere when waves break; others less so, researchers reported. A team of chemists, oceanographers, microbiologists, geneticists, and pediatric medicine specialists are attempting to understand how far potentially infectious bacteria and viruses can travel and if those that pose the greatest risks to public health are among those most likely to escape the ocean. Find out more...

Cold production of new seafloor

Thu, 24 May 2018 11:24:01 EDT ~ Magma steadily emerges between oceanic plates. It pushes the plates apart, builds large underwater mountains and forms new seafloor. This is one of the fundamental processes that constantly change the face of the Earth. But there are also times when new seabed is created without any volcanism, by un-roofing mantle material directly at the seafloor. Scientists have now published the first estimation based on seismic data on how much seafloor is produced this way. Find out more...

For the past 70 years, the Danube has almost never frozen over

Thu, 24 May 2018 11:23:11 EDT ~ Since the 1950s, warmer and warmer winters and man-made inflows have largely prevented ice formation on Europe's second-largest river. Find out more...

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient corals

Wed, 23 May 2018 13:32:36 EDT ~ Experimentalists conducted a simulation of future conditions in the Red Sea caused by global warming and acidification, while simultaneously increasing levels of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. They found that when nitrate and phosphate were added, the coral thermal resilience was compromised while algal growth benefited from excess CO2 and nutrients. Algal dominance over corals in the reef means losing all of the beauty and biodiversity of the coral reefs. Find out more...

The gypsum gravity chute: A phytoplankton-elevator to the ocean floor

Tue, 22 May 2018 12:32:43 EDT ~ Tiny gypsum crystals can make phytoplankton so heavy that they rapidly sink, hereby transporting large quantities of carbon to the ocean's depths. Find out more...

Widespread ocean anoxia was cause for past mass extinction

Mon, 21 May 2018 15:43:04 EDT ~ For decades, scientists have conducted research centered around the five major mass extinctions that have shaped the world we live in. The extinctions date back more than 450 million years with the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction to the deadliest extinction, the Late Permian extinction 250 million years ago that wiped out over 90 percent of species. Find out more...

Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent

Mon, 21 May 2018 09:56:18 EDT ~ A new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters. Find out more...

The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cycles

Thu, 17 May 2018 10:22:30 EDT ~ In a general context of climate change, researchers have revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Nio, on the survival of the Nazca booby. Their research shows for the first time that long cycles directly affect the survival of adult populations. Find out more...

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South

Thu, 17 May 2018 08:18:29 EDT ~ A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought. Find out more...