MarineBio Conservation SocietyOceanography News   :: ScienceDaily

Stable gas hydrates can trigger landslides

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 16:12:24 EST ~ Like avalanches onshore, there are different processes that cause submarine landslides. One very widespread assumption is that they are associated with dissociating gas hydrates in the seafloor. However, scientists have now found evidence that the context could be quite different. Find out more...

Beluga whales dive deeper, longer to find food in Arctic

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 16:12:16 EST ~ Beluga whales that spend summers feeding in the Arctic are diving deeper and longer to find food than in earlier years, when sea ice covered more of the ocean for longer periods, according to a new analysis. Find out more...

Industry is leaking huge amounts of microplastics, Swedish study shows

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 12:45:46 EST ~ Millions of plastic pellets are leaking out into the environment from a manufacturing site in Stenungsund, according to a new Swedish study. Despite several international and national sets of regulatory frameworks, the leaking continues. Find out more...

Sea-level legacy: 20 cm more rise by 2300 for each 5-year delay in peaking emissions

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 12:30:39 EST ~ Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement. Find out more...

Oil-eating microbes are challenged in the Arctic

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:41:12 EST ~ Bacteria play a major role in cleaning up oil spills and mitigating its environmental impacts. In a new paper, researchers examine the major limiting factors for microbial degradation in Arctic environments. Find out more...

High levels of microplastics found in Northwest Atlantic fish

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:05:13 EST ~ A new study finds 73 percent of mesopelagic fish caught in the Northwest Atlantic had microplastics in their stomachs -- one of the highest levels globally. Typically living at depths of 200-1,000 meters, these fish could spread microplastic pollution throughout the marine ecosystem, by carrying microplastics from the surface down to deeper waters. They are also prey for fish eaten by humans, meaning that microplastics could indirectly contaminate our food supply. Find out more...

Geophysicists and atmospheric scientists partner to track typhoons' seismic footprints

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:11:45 EST ~ A remarkable collaboration between atmospheric science and geophysics could change the way we think about storms and seismicity, and could lead to an answer to the often-asked 'Are hurricanes getting stronger?' The team has identified the seismic footprint of typhoons and hurricanes, which allows climate scientists to add decades to their dataset of powerful storms. Find out more...

Hurricanes Irma and Maria temporarily altered choruses of land and sea animals

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:50:16 EST ~ Audio recordings of Hurricanes Irma and Maria's passage over Puerto Rico document how the calls of coastal critters changed in response to the deadly storms. The hurricanes caused a major disruption in the acoustic activity of snapping shrimp, a reduction in insect and bird sounds, and potentially an intensification of fish choruses, according to new research. Find out more...

Mystery of phytoplankton survival in nutrient-poor pacific

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 11:03:35 EST ~ Upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean provides essential nutrients for the regions microscopic plants, but iron a key ingredient that facilitates nitrogen consumption is in short supply. To compensate, the phytoplankton band together to recycle the scarce metal and retain it in their upper-ocean habitat, scientists have discovered. Find out more...

Key to predicting climate change could be blowing in the wind

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:57:13 EST ~ Dust that blew into the North Pacific Ocean could help explain why the Earth's climate cooled 2.7 million years ago, according to a new study. Find out more...