MarineBio Conservation SocietyOceanography News   :: ScienceDaily

Motley crews of bacteria cleanse water at huge oceanic Georgia Aquarium exhibit

Tue, 23 Oct 2018 13:04:44 EDT ~ Good bacteria cleaning water in Georgia Aquarium's huge oceanic exhibit delivered a nice surprise to researchers. The aquarium wanted to know which bacteria were at work, so oceanic biochemists analyzed them: The bacterial colonies raised eyebrows because they were virtually indistinguishable from those found in natural settings. Find out more...

How microplastics, marine aggregates and marine animals are connected

Tue, 23 Oct 2018 11:05:51 EDT ~ Prior research has suggested that mussels are a robust indicator of plastic debris and particles in marine environments. A new study says that's not the case because mussels are picky eaters and have an inherent ability to choose and sort their food. Instead, the researchers have discovered that marine aggregates also called ''marine snow,'' play a much bigger role in the fate of the oceans when it comes to plastic debris. Find out more...

Web-based open source dashboard of North Pole

Mon, 22 Oct 2018 08:58:38 EDT ~ It's called ArcCI (or Arctic CyberInfrastructure) and promises to combine the thousands of images that have been taken along the years of the Arctic Ocean into one global database that will help scientists and the world see the physical changes occurring in the region including ice loss. The hope is that this web-based repository will allow researchers to spend more time analyzing information rather than just collecting and processing data. Find out more...

Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail

Wed, 17 Oct 2018 14:10:11 EDT ~ In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities. Find out more...

Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

Wed, 17 Oct 2018 14:09:25 EDT ~ Scientists have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the 'ice-ocean governor,' that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores. Researchers report that the Arctic's ice cover essentially sets a speed limit on the gyre's spin. Find out more...

World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels

Wed, 17 Oct 2018 11:10:22 EDT ~ In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise. Find out more...

Antarctic ice shelf 'sings' as winds whip across its surface

Tue, 16 Oct 2018 15:06:54 EDT ~ Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab's surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant set of seismic 'tones' scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research. Find out more...

Arctic sea ice decline driving ocean phytoplankton farther north

Mon, 15 Oct 2018 14:15:14 EDT ~ A new study reveals phytoplankton spring blooms in the Arctic Ocean, which were previously nonexistent, are expanding northward at a rate of one degree of latitude per decade. Although blooms did not previously occur in this area, phytoplankton were present in the Arctic's central basin at low biomass. The study also found the primary productivity of the phytoplankton, or the rate at which phytoplankton convert sunlight into chemical energy, is increasing during the spring blooms. Find out more...

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

Mon, 15 Oct 2018 10:05:08 EDT ~ A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate. Find out more...

Predicting an El Nio or La Nia year 17 months in advance

Mon, 15 Oct 2018 08:46:33 EDT ~ El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) leads to extreme climatic variations called El Nio and La Nia that cause dangerous weather conditions in many regions throughout the world. Currently, a reliable forecast of the ENSO phases can be made about a year beforehand. This study details a novel method that allows for the accurate forecast of its phases up to 17 months in advance. Find out more...