MarineBio Conservation SocietyOceanography News   :: ScienceDaily

East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 14:36:50 EST ~ The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet). It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland shrink. New research has found that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet may not be as stable as it seems. Find out more...

Fish and ships: Vessel traffic reduces communication ranges for Atlantic cod, haddock

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:56:04 EST ~ Scientists studying sounds made by Atlantic cod and haddock at spawning sites in the Gulf of Maine have found that vessel traffic noise is reducing the distance over which these animals can communicate with each other. As a result, daily behavior, feeding, mating, and socializing during critical biological periods for these commercially and ecologically important fish may be altered, according to a new study. Find out more...

The planets largest landslides happen on submarine volcanoes

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 11:48:11 EST ~ Large volume submarine landslides, triggered by the inception and growth of submarine volcanos, represent among the largest mass movements of sediment on Earths surface. These landslides could potentially cause tsunamis, and represent a significant, and as yet unaccounted for marine hazard. Find out more...

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 14:57:28 EST ~ The most extensive, long-term effort to monitor turbidity currents ever attempted has just been completed. The results of this two-year project challenge existing paradigms about what causes turbidity currents, what they look like, and how they work. Find out more...

Tiny ice losses at Antarctica's fringes can accelerate ice loss far away

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:04:34 EST ~ It is known that the ice shelves surrounding the continent regulate the ice flow from the land into the ocean. Now scientists found that also melting near the fringes and in the midst of the ice shelves can have direct effects reaching very far inland. This could increase ice loss and hence sea-level rise. Find out more...

World-first uses satellites, ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversity

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:04:16 EST ~ In a world-first, a research team has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor. Find out more...

New Tongan island made of 'tuff' stuff, likely to persist years, NASA shows

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:01:29 EST ~ In late December 2014, a submarine volcano in the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga erupted, sending a violent stream of steam, ash and rock into the air. The ash plumes rose as high as 30,000 feet (9 kilometers) into the sky, diverting flights. When the ash finally settled in January 2015, a newborn island with a 400-foot (120-meter) summit nestled between two older islands -- visible to satellites in space. Find out more...

'Smoke rings' in the ocean could 'suck-up' small creatures and send them 'flying'

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 10:50:14 EST ~ Researchers have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean. Find out more...

Extreme fieldwork, climate modeling yields new insight into predicting Greenland's melt

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 14:30:21 EST ~ A new study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery. Researchers discovered that some meltwater from the lakes and rivers atop the region's glaciers, is being stored and trapped on top of the glacier inside a low-density, porous 'rotten ice.' This phenomenon affects climate model predictions of Greenland's meltwater. Find out more...

Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 09:55:24 EST ~ A single plastic grocery bag could be shredded by marine organisms into 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research. Find out more...