MarineBio Conservation SocietySea Life News   :: ScienceDaily

UV-sensing protein in brain of marine annelid zooplankton

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:20:19 EDT ~ Larvae of a marine ragworm Platynereis dumerilii have been studied as a zooplankton model, and possess photoreceptor cells in the brain to regulate circadian swimming behavior. This study revealed that a photoreceptive protein in the brain photoreceptor cells is UV (ultra-violet) sensitive. Since avoidance of UV irradiation is a major cause of a large-scale daily movement of zooplankton, the UV sensor in the brain would be important for physiology and ecology of the zooplankton model. Find out more...

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at risk

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 10:40:39 EDT ~ There were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event, a study of historic whaling records has revealed. Find out more...

Algae: The final frontier

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 16:59:31 EDT ~ Algae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review. Find out more...

Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 11:39:57 EDT ~ Warmer temperatures associated with climate change may lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure, suggests a new report. Find out more...

Eating fish may reduce arthritis symptoms

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 08:28:09 EDT ~ In a recent study, individuals with rheumatoid arthritis who consumed fish twice weekly had lower disease activity (swollen/tender joint counts along with other assessments) than those who ate fish never to <1/month. Find out more...

Deaths of migrating wildebeests key to Serengeti's vibrant ecosystem

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 15:15:23 EDT ~ Wildebeest carcasses, casualties of the world's largest overland animal migration, pile up annually on the banks of the Mara River in Africa and play a crucial role in vibrant ecosystem of the Serengeti plains, a new study has found. Find out more...

Holes drilled in shells point to bigger predators picking on small prey

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:27:28 EDT ~ The drill holes left in fossil shells by hunters such as snails and slugs show marine predators have grown steadily bigger and more powerful over time but stuck to picking off small prey, rather than using their added heft to pursue larger quarry, new research shows. Find out more...

Distant fish relatives share looks

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 10:06:28 EDT ~ Scientists have found evidence that even distantly related Australian fish species have evolved to look and act like each other, which confirms a central tenet of evolutionary theory. Find out more...

Eyes in the sky reveal extent of gray seal recovery

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 13:37:42 EDT ~ Using research drones, thermal cameras and free images from Google Earth, two studies confirm that gray seals are making a comeback off the New England and eastern Canadian coasts. The findings help confirm that seal conservation efforts are working, and that these remote eye-in-the sky technologies make it easier and safer for scientists to study migratory wildlife in remote locations and estimate their numbers accurately. Find out more...

Polar bears' declining mercury levels likely due to climate-related shifts

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 09:18:20 EDT ~ To understand how human activities are affecting the planet, scientists often study the health of animals in the wild. Now a new study finds that the levels of mercury in some polar bears are declining. But rather than heralding a drop in mercury in the environment, the decrease could indicate how climate change has led the animals to shift foraging habits, which has affected their diets and weight. Find out more...