MarineBio Conservation SocietySea Life News   :: ScienceDaily

Protected waters foster resurgence of West Coast rockfish

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 15:49:55 EDT ~ West Coast rockfish species in deep collapse only 20 years ago have multiplied rapidly in large marine protected areas off Southern California, likely seeding surrounding waters with enough offspring to offer promise of renewed fishing, a new study has found. Find out more...

North Atlantic right whales decline confirmed: 458 remaining

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 14:04:19 EDT ~ Marine biologists have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. Between 1990 and 2010 abundance increased to 482 animals, but since 2010 the numbers have declined to 458 in 2015, with 14 known deaths this year. Find out more...

Declining queen conch populations are fragmented and that's changing the conservation game

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 09:10:02 EDT ~ To provide a vital scientific foundation for conservation efforts, an international team has conducted a genetic analysis comparing queen conch at 19 sites throughout the Caribbean. Their findings will help scientists understand how local subpopulations of conch are fragmented throughout the Caribbean, an essential first step needed to develop effective science-driven management plans and practices. Find out more...

Catching a diversity of fish species instead of specializing means more stable income for fishers

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:23:49 EDT ~ A team of scientists analyzed nearly 30 years of revenue and permitting records for individuals fishing in Alaskan waters and tracked how their fishing choices, in terms of permits purchased and species caught, influenced their year-to-year income volatility. Find out more...

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 13:27:32 EDT ~ Animals in the Goldilocks zone -- neither too big, nor too small, but just the right size -- face a lower risk of extinction than do those on both ends of the scale, according to an extensive global analysis. Find out more...

Six new sponge species and new symbiotic associations from the Indonesian coral triangle

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:18:21 EDT ~ The Indonesian coral reefs, located in the so-called coral triangle, are considered amongst the richest and most biodiverse places on Earth. Surprisingly, this impressive species diversity is still poorly known. Biologists now report the presence of 94 species of sponges, including six new to science and two new symbiotic sponge associations. Find out more...

Electric eels leap to deliver painful, Taser-like jolt

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 15:24:20 EDT ~ The electric eel has always been noted for its impressive ability to shock and subdue its prey. It's recently become clear that electric eels also use a clever trick to deliver an intense, Taser-like jolt to potential predators: they leap from the water to target threatening animals, humans included, above water. Now, a researcher has measured (and experienced) just how strong that jolt can be. Find out more...

Old fish few and far between under fishing pressure

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 15:23:43 EDT ~ A new study has found that, for dozens of fish populations around the globe, old fish are greatly depleted -- mainly because of fishing pressure. Old fish are increasingly missing in many populations around the world. Find out more...

Tiny fighters in sediments determine success of invasive marine plants

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 15:23:22 EDT ~ Armies of microbes that are invisible to the naked eye battle it out to determine whether exotic marine plants successfully invade new territory and replace native species, new research shows. The genetic study, which compared microbial communities in sediments associated with an invasive alga and a native seagrass, is the first to test the idea that marine microbes play a critical role in the establishment of invasive marine species. Find out more...

Fish food for marine farms harbor antibiotic resistance genes

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 19:31:26 EDT ~ From isolated caves to ancient permafrost, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes for resistance have been showing up in unexpected places. As scientists puzzle over how genes for antibiotic resistance arise in various environments and what risks to human health they might pose, one team has identified a surprising way some of these genes are getting into ocean sediments: through food for marine fisheries. Find out more...