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Discovery without Destruction: a minimally invasive approach to new species

A new study by Ziegler and Sargony (2021) has demonstrated how non-invasive methods can be used to record and catalogue new species of megafauna. Traditional methods including collecting specimens to handle physically which, aside from killing the specimen, can also damage the structures of the organism - impairing proper scientific understanding. While non-destructive imaging techniques have proven effective in describing novel species of small organisms this is the first time it has be utilised for a deep-sea megafauna, the cirrate octopus - Grimpoteuthis imperator.

2021-05-08T07:59:04-05:00May 5th, 2021|Categories: Science News, Species News|Tags: , , |

Sealab

“On a February day in 1969, off the shore of northern California, a US Navy crane carefully lowered 300 tons of metal into the Pacific Ocean. The massive tubular structure was an audacious feat of engineering — a pressurized underwater habitat, complete with science labs and living quarters for an elite group of divers who hoped to spend days or even months at a stretch living and working on the ocean floor."

2021-05-02T18:45:46-05:00February 12th, 2019|Categories: Science News|Tags: , |
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