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  • Discovery without Destruction: a minimally invasive approach to new species

    A new study by Ziegler and Sargony (2021) has demonstrated how non-invasive methods can be used to record and catalogue new species of megafauna. Traditional methods including collecting specimens to handle physically which, aside from killing the specimen, can also damage the structures of the organism - impairing proper scientific understanding. While non-destructive imaging techniques have proven effective in describing novel species of small organisms this is the first time it has be utilised for a deep-sea megafauna, the cirrate octopus - Grimpoteuthis imperator.

  • Study shows acute toxicity of microplastics in filter feeding fish

    A recent paper by Zhang et al. (2021) explores the acute toxicity of microplastics on a filter-feeding planktivorous fish, Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix).

  • Octopuses, neighbourly or not?

    A recent study in the journal of Marine Biology has tested a different method of investigating social behaviour in octopuses. Traditionally octopuses have been seen as asocial creatures that ignore others of their species (conspecifics) but recent discoveries of aggregations or groups of wild octopuses such as: algae octopuses (Abdopus aculeatus), Graneledone octopuses, Muusoctopus octopuses, Caribbean Reef Octopuses (Octopus briareus), Atlantic pygmy octopuses (Octopus joubini), Octopus laqueus, Common Sydney octopuses (Octopus tetricus) and Vulcanoctopus hydrothermalis.

  • Some like it hot, but not salmon

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are an important species of fish both for their ecological value and commercial value. These anadromous fish are spawned in rivers, travel to the sea to grow and mature before returning to the stream or river they were born in to spawn the next generation. As such the ability to swim against strong currents and up natural barriers is important, which is why a recent study published in the Canadian Journal of Zoology is concerning.

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