IUCN World Conservation Congress

Registration » The IUCN World Conservation Congress 2020 will cover seven themes. The IUCN World Conservation Congress brings together the global nature conservation community, including top international [...]

IMBeR ClimEco7

Interdisciplinary ocean science for sustainable development Registration » ClimEco7 is the seventh in a series of “Climate and Ecosystems” biennial summer schools organised by IMBeR, the [...]

6th International EcoSummit (Online EcoSummit 2021)

Building a sustainable and desirable future Live-streamed and interactive - Gold Coast, Australia Registration » Please note that to join the conference live you must register [...]

52nd Liège Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics

Towards understanding and assessing human impacts on coastal marine environments Registration » The coastal ocean (i.e. regions that are directly influenced by their watershed, including estuaries) [...]

Food for thought: can climate change affect wild appetites?

In a recent forum by Youngentob et al. (2021) pose this fascinating question, given that endotherms commonly reduce their voluntary food intake in warm temperatures - could reduced food intake be an overlooked driver of climate change casualties?

How Climate Change affects Baltic mussels

Mytilus mussels are keystone species in the Baltic Sea: they build reefs which provide more complex habitats for various species (macrofauna, macroalgae and meiofauna), filter water (linking the pelagic and benthic systems) and are a staple food source for numerous organisms (eider ducks, flounder, crabs, starfish and the larval stages feed herring larvae and other carnivorous zooplankton). They can also be extremely numerous – forming up to 90% of the animal biomass in some shallow waters.

2021-04-25T11:18:04-05:00April 22nd, 2021|Categories: Species News|Tags: , , , , |
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